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Saturday, April 16 2016

OpenType MATH in HarfBuzz

TL;DR:

  • Work is in progress to add OpenType MATH support in HarfBuzz and will be instrumental for many math rendering engines relying on that library, including browsers.

  • For stretchy operators, an efficient way to determine the required number of glyphs and their overlaps has been implemented and is described here.

In the context of Igalia browser team effort to implement MathML support using TeX rules and OpenType features, I have started implementation of OpenType MATH support in HarfBuzz. This table from the OpenType standard is made of three subtables:

  • The MathConstants table, which contains layout constants. For example, the thickness of the fraction bar of ab\frac{a}{b}.

  • The MathGlyphInfo table, which contains glyph properties. For instance, the italic correction indicating how slanted an integral is e.g. to properly place the subscript in D\displaystyle\displaystyle\int_{D}.

  • The MathVariants table, which provides larger size variants for a base glyph or data to build a glyph assembly. For example, either a larger parenthesis or a assembly of U+239B, U+239C, U+239D to write something like:

      (abcdefgh\left(\frac{\frac{\frac{a}{b}}{\frac{c}{d}}}{\frac{\frac{e}{f}}{\frac{g}{h}}}\right.  

Code to parse this table was added to Gecko and WebKit two years ago. The existing code to build glyph assembly in these Web engines was adapted to use the MathVariants data instead of only private tables. However, as we will see below the MathVariants data to build glyph assembly is more general, with arbitrary number of glyphs or with additional constraints on glyph overlaps. Also there are various fallback mechanisms for old fonts and other bugs that I think we could get rid of when we move to OpenType MATH fonts only.

In order to add MathML support in Blink, it is very easy to import the OpenType MATH parsing code from WebKit. However, after discussions with some Google developers, it seems that the best option is to directly add support for this table in HarfBuzz. Since this library is used by Gecko, by WebKit (at least the GTK port) and by many other applications such as Servo, XeTeX or LibreOffice it make senses to share the implementation to improve math rendering everywhere.

The idea for HarfBuzz is to add an API to

  1. 1.

    Expose data from the MathConstants and MathGlyphInfo.

  2. 2.

    Shape stretchy operators to some target size with the help of the MathVariants.

It is then up to a higher-level math rendering engine (e.g. TeX or MathML rendering engines) to beautifully display mathematical formulas using this API. The design choice for exposing MathConstants and MathGlyphInfo is almost obvious from the reading of the MATH table specification. The choice for the shaping API is a bit more complex and discussions is still in progress. For example because we want to accept stretching after glyph-level mirroring (e.g. to draw RTL clockwise integrals) we should accept any glyph and not just an input Unicode strings as it is the case for other HarfBuzz shaping functions. This shaping also depends on a stretching direction (horizontal/vertical) or on a target size (and Gecko even currently has various ways to approximate that target size). Finally, we should also have a way to expose italic correction for a glyph assembly or to approximate preferred width for Web rendering engines.

As I mentioned at the beginning, the data and algorithm to build glyph assembly is the most complex part of the OpenType MATH and deserves a special interest. The idea is that you have a list of n1n\geq 1 glyphs available to build the assembly. For each 0in-10\leq i\leq n-1, the glyph gig_{i} has advance aia_{i} in the stretch direction. Each gig_{i} has straight connector part at its start (of length sis_{i}) and at its end (of length eie_{i}) so that we can align the glyphs on the stretch axis and glue them together. Also, some of the glyphs are “extenders” which means that they can be repeated 0, 1 or more times to make the assembly as large as possible. Finally, the end/start connectors of consecutive glyphs must overlap by at least a fixed value omino_{\mathrm{min}} to avoid gaps at some resolutions but of course without exceeding the length of the corresponding connectors. This gives some flexibility to adjust the size of the assembly and get closer to the target size tt.

gig_{i}

sis_{i}

eie_{i}

aia_{i}

gi+1g_{i+1}

si+1s_{i+1}

ei+1e_{i+1}

ai+1a_{i+1}

oi,i+1o_{i,i+1}

Figure 0.1: Two adjacent glyphs in an assembly

To ensure that the width/height is distributed equally and the symmetry of the shape is preserved, the MATH table specification suggests the following iterative algorithm to determine the number of extenders and the connector overlaps to reach a minimal target size tt:

  1. 1.

    Assemble all parts by overlapping connectors by maximum amount, and removing all extenders. This gives the smallest possible result.

  2. 2.

    Determine how much extra width/height can be distributed into all connections between neighboring parts. If that is enough to achieve the size goal, extend each connection equally by changing overlaps of connectors to finish the job.

  3. 3.

    If all connections have been extended to minimum overlap and further growth is needed, add one of each extender, and repeat the process from the first step.

We note that at each step, each extender is repeated the same number of times r0r\geq 0. So if IExtI_{\mathrm{Ext}} (respectively INonExtI_{\mathrm{NonExt}}) is the set of indices 0in-10\leq i\leq n-1 such that gig_{i} is an extender (respectively is not an extender) we have ri=rr_{i}=r (respectively ri=1r_{i}=1). The size we can reach at step rr is at most the one obtained with the minimal connector overlap omino_{\mathrm{min}} that is

i=0N-1(j=1riai-omin)+omin=(iINonExtai-omin)+(iIExtr(ai-omin))+omin\sum_{i=0}^{N-1}\left(\sum_{j=1}^{r_{i}}{a_{i}-o_{\mathrm{min}}}\right)+o_{% \mathrm{min}}=\left(\sum_{i\in I_{\mathrm{NonExt}}}{a_{i}-o_{\mathrm{min}}}% \right)+\left(\sum_{i\in I_{\mathrm{Ext}}}r{(a_{i}-o_{\mathrm{min}})}\right)+o% _{\mathrm{min}}

We let NExt=|IExt|N_{\mathrm{Ext}}={|I_{\mathrm{Ext}}|} and NNonExt=|INonExt|N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}={|I_{\mathrm{NonExt}}|} be the number of extenders and non-extenders. We also let SExt=iIExtaiS_{\mathrm{Ext}}=\sum_{i\in I_{\mathrm{Ext}}}a_{i} and SNonExt=iINonExtaiS_{\mathrm{NonExt}}=\sum_{i\in I_{\mathrm{NonExt}}}a_{i} be the sum of advances for extenders and non-extenders. If we want the advance of the glyph assembly to reach the minimal size tt then

  SNonExt-omin(NNonExt-1)+r(SExt-ominNExt)t{S_{\mathrm{NonExt}}-o_{\mathrm{min}}\left(N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}-1\right)}+{r% \left(S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-o_{\mathrm{min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}\right)}\geq t  

We can assume SExt-ominNExt>0S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-o_{\mathrm{min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}>0 or otherwise we would have the extreme case where the overlap takes at least the full advance of each extender. Then we obtain

  rrmin=max(0,t-SNonExt+omin(NNonExt-1)SExt-ominNExt)r\geq r_{\mathrm{min}}=\max\left(0,\left\lceil\frac{t-{S_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+o_{% \mathrm{min}}\left(N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}-1\right)}}{S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-o_{\mathrm{% min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}}\right\rceil\right)  

This provides a first simplification of the algorithm sketched in the MATH table specification: Directly start iteration at step rminr_{\mathrm{min}}. Note that at each step we start at possibly different maximum overlaps and decrease all of them by a same value. It is not clear what to do when one of the overlap reaches omino_{\mathrm{min}} while others can still be decreased. However, the sketched algorithm says all the connectors should reach minimum overlap before the next increment of rr, which means the target size will indeed be reached at step rminr_{\mathrm{min}}.

One possible interpretation is to stop overlap decreasing for the adjacent connectors that reached minimum overlap and to continue uniform decreasing for the others until all the connectors reach minimum overlap. In that case we may lose equal distribution or symmetry. In practice, this should probably not matter much. So we propose instead the dual option which should behave more or less the same in most cases: Start with all overlaps set to omino_{\mathrm{min}} and increase them evenly to reach a same value oo. By the same reasoning as above we want the inequality

  SNonExt-o(NNonExt-1)+rmin(SExt-oNExt)t{S_{\mathrm{NonExt}}-o\left(N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}-1\right)}+{r_{\mathrm{min}}% \left(S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-oN_{\mathrm{Ext}}\right)}\geq t  

which can be rewritten

  SNonExt+rminSExt-o(NNonExt+rminNExt-1)tS_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+r_{\mathrm{min}}S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-{o\left(N_{\mathrm{NonExt% }}+{r_{\mathrm{min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}}-1\right)}\geq t  

We note that N=NNonExt+rminNExtN=N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+{r_{\mathrm{min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}} is just the exact number of glyphs used in the assembly. If there is only a single glyph, then the overlap value is irrelevant so we can assume NNonExt+rNExt-1=N-11N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+{rN_{\mathrm{Ext}}}-1=N-1\geq 1. This provides the greatest theorical value for the overlap oo:

  ominoomaxtheorical=SNonExt+rminSExt-tNNonExt+rminNExt-1o_{\mathrm{min}}\leq o\leq o_{\mathrm{max}}^{\mathrm{theorical}}=\frac{S_{% \mathrm{NonExt}}+r_{\mathrm{min}}S_{\mathrm{Ext}}-t}{N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+{r_{% \mathrm{min}}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}}-1}  

Of course, we also have to take into account the limit imposed by the start and end connector lengths. So omaxo_{\mathrm{max}} must also be at most min(ei,si+1)\min{(e_{i},s_{i+1})} for 0in-20\leq i\leq n-2. But if rmin2r_{\mathrm{min}}\geq 2 then extender copies are connected and so omaxo_{\mathrm{max}} must also be at most min(ei,si)\min{(e_{i},s_{i})} for iIExti\in I_{\mathrm{Ext}}. To summarize, omaxo_{\mathrm{max}} is the minimum of omaxtheoricalo_{\mathrm{max}}^{\mathrm{theorical}}, of eie_{i} for 0in-20\leq i\leq n-2, of sis_{i} 1in-11\leq i\leq n-1 and possibly of e0e_{0} (if 0IExt0\in I_{\mathrm{Ext}}) and of of sn-1s_{n-1} (if n-1IExt{n-1}\in I_{\mathrm{Ext}}).

With the algorithm described above NExtN_{\mathrm{Ext}}, NNonExtN_{\mathrm{NonExt}}, SExtS_{\mathrm{Ext}}, SNonExtS_{\mathrm{NonExt}} and rminr_{\mathrm{min}} and omaxo_{\mathrm{max}} can all be obtained using simple loops on the glyphs gig_{i} and so the complexity is O(n)O(n). In practice nn is small: For existing fonts, assemblies are made of at most three non-extenders and two extenders that is n5n\leq 5 (incidentally, Gecko and WebKit do not currently support larger values of nn). This means that all the operations described above can be considered to have constant complexity. This is much better than a naive implementation of the iterative algorithm sketched in the OpenType MATH table specification which seems to require at worst

  r=0rmin-1NNonExt+rNExt=NNonExtrmin+rmin(rmin-1)2NExt=O(n×rmin2)\sum_{r=0}^{r_{\mathrm{min}}-1}{N_{\mathrm{NonExt}}+rN_{\mathrm{Ext}}}=N_{% \mathrm{NonExt}}r_{\mathrm{min}}+\frac{r_{\mathrm{min}}\left(r_{\mathrm{min}}-% 1\right)}{2}N_{\mathrm{Ext}}={O(n\times r_{\mathrm{min}}^{2})}  

and at least Ω(rmin)\Omega(r_{\mathrm{min}}).

One of issue is that the number of extender repetitions rminr_{\mathrm{min}} and the number of glyphs in the assembly NN can become arbitrary large since the target size tt can take large values e.g. if one writes \underbrace{\hspace{65535em}} in LaTeX. The improvement proposed here does not solve that issue since setting the coordinates of each glyph in the assembly and painting them require Θ(N)\Theta(N) operations as well as (in the case of HarfBuzz) a glyph buffer of size NN. However, such large stretchy operators do not happen in real-life mathematical formulas. Hence to avoid possible hangs in Web engines a solution is to impose a maximum limit NmaxN_{\mathrm{max}} for the number of glyph in the assembly so that the complexity is limited by the size of the DOM tree. Currently, the proposal for HarfBuzz is Nmax=128N_{\mathrm{max}}=128. This means that if each assembly glyph is 1em large you won’t be able to draw stretchy operators of size more than 128em, which sounds a quite reasonable bound. With the above proposal, rminr_{\mathrm{min}} and so NN can be determined very quickly and the cases NNmaxN\geq N_{\mathrm{max}} rejected, so that we avoid losing time with such edge cases…

Finally, because in our proposal we use the same overlap oo everywhere an alternative for HarfBuzz would be to set the output buffer size to nn (i.e. ignore r-1r-1 copies of each extender and only keep the first one). This will leave gaps that the client can fix by repeating extenders as long as oo is also provided. Then HarfBuzz math shaping can be done with a complexity in time and space of just O(n)O(n) and it will be up to the client to optimize or limit the painting of extenders for large values of NN

Sunday, December 20 2015

MathML at the Web Engines Hackfest 2015

Hackfest

Two weeks ago, I travelled to Spain to participate to the second Web Engines Hackfest which was sponsored by Igalia and Collabora. Such an event has been organized by Igalia since 2009 and used to be focused on WebkitGTK+. It is great to see that it has now been extended to any Web engines & platforms and that a large percentage of non-igalian developers has been involved this year. If you did not get the opportunity to attend this event or if you are curious about what happened there, take a look at the wiki page or flickr album.

Last day of the hackfest
Photo from @webengineshackfest licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

I really like this kind of hacking-oriented and participant-driven event where developers can meet face to face, organize themselves in small collaboration groups to efficiently make progress on a task or give passionate talk about what they have recently been working on. The only small bemol I have is that it is still mainly focused on WebKit/Blink developments. Probably, the lack of Mozilla/Microsoft participants is probably due to Mozilla Coincidental Work Weeks happening at the same period and to the proprietary nature of EdgeHTML (although this is changing?). However, I am confident that Igalia will try and address this issue and I am looking forward to coming back next year!

MathML developments

This year, Igalia developer Alejandro G. Castro wanted to work with me on WebKit's MathML layout code and more specifically on his MathML refactoring branch. Indeed, as many people (including Google developers) who have tried to work on WebKit's code in the past, he arrived to the conclusion that the WebKit's MathML layout code has many design issues that make it a burden for the rest of the layout team and too complex to allow future improvements. I was quite excited about the work he has done with Javier Fernández to try and move to a simple box model closer to what exists in Gecko and thus I actually extended my stay to work one whole week with them. We already submitted our proposal to the webkit-dev mailing list and received positive feedback, so we will now start merging what is ready. At the end of the week, we were quite satisfied about the new approach and confident it will facilitate future maintenance and developements :-)

Main room
Photo from @webengineshackfest licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

While reading a recent thread on the Math WG mailing list, I realized that many MathML people have only vague understanding of why Google (or to be more accurate, the 3 or 4 engineers who really spent some time reviewing and testing the WebKit code) considered the implementation to be unsafe and not ready for release. Even worse, Michael Kholhase pointed out that for someone totally ignorant of the technical implementation details, the communication made some years ago around the "flexbox-based approach" gave the impression that it was "the right way" (indeed, it somewhat did improve the initial implementation) and the rationale to change that approach was not obvious. So let's just try and give a quick overview of the main problems, even if I doubt someone can have good understanding of the situation without diving into the C++ code:

  1. WebKit's code to stretch operator was not efficient at all and was limited to some basic fences buildable via Unicode characters.
  2. WebKit's MathML code violated many layout invariants, making the code unreliable.
  3. WebKit's MathML code relied heavily on the C++ renderer classes for flexboxes and has to manage too many anonymous renderers.

The main security concerns were addressed a long time ago by Martin Robinson and me. Glyph assembly for stretchy operators are now drawn using low-level font painting primitive instead of creating one renderer object for each piece and the preferred width for them no longer depends on vertical metrics (although we still need some work to obtain Gecko's good operator spacing). Also, during my crowdfunding project, I implemented partial support for the OpenType MATH table in WebKit and more specifically the MathVariant subtable, which allows to directly use construction of stretchy operators specified by the font designer and not only the few Unicode constructions.

However, the MathML layout code still modifies the renderer tree to force the presence of anonymous renderers and still applies specific CSS rules to them. It is also spending too much time trying to adapt the parent flexbox renderer class which has at the same time too much features for what is needed for MathML (essentially automatic box alignment) and not enough to get exact placement and measuring needed for high-quality rendering (the TeXBook rules are more complex, taking into account various parameters for box shifts, drops, gaps etc).

During the hackfest, we started to rewrite a clean implementation of some MathML renderer classes similar to Gecko's one and based on the MathML in HTML5 implementation note. The code now becomes very simple and understandable. It can be summarized into four main functions. For instance, to draw a fraction we need:

  • computePreferredLogicalWidths which sets the preferred width of the fraction during the first layout pass, by considering the widest between numerator and denominator.
  • layoutBlock and firstLineBaseline which calculate the final width/height/ascent of the fraction element and position the numerator and denominator.
  • paint which draws the fraction bar.

Perhaps, the best example to illustrate how the complexity has been reduced is the case of the renderer of mmultiscripts/msub/msup/msubsup elements (attaching an arbitrary number of subscripts and superscripts before or after a base). In the current WebKit implementation, we have to create three anonymous wrappers (a first one for the base, a second one for prescripts and a third one for postscripts) and an anonymous wrapper for each subscript/superscript pair, add alignment styles for these wrappers and spend a lot of time maintaining the integrity of the renderer tree when dynamic changes happen. With the new code, we just need to do arithmetic calculations to position the base and script boxes. This is somewhat more complex than the fraction example above but still, it remains arithmetic calculations and we can not reduce any further if we wish quality comparable to TeXBook / MATH rules. We actually take into account many parameters from the OpenType MATH table to get much better placement of scripts. We were able to fix bug 130325 in about twenty minutes instead of fighting with a CSS "negative margin" hack on anonymous renderers.

MathML dicussions

The first day of the hackfest we also had an interesting "breakout session" to define the tasks to work on during the hackfest. Alejandro briefly presented the status of his refactoring branch and his plan for the hackfest. As said in the previous section, we have been quite successful in following this plan: Although it is not fully complete yet, we expect to merge the current changes soon. Dominik Röttsches who works on Blink's font and layout modules was present at the MathML session and it was a good opportunity to discuss the future of MathML in Chrome. I gave him some references regarding the OpenType MATH table, math fonts and the MathML in HTML5 implementation note. Dominik said he will forward the references to his colleagues working on layout so that we can have deeper technical dicussion about MathML in Blink in the long term. Also, I mentioned noto-fonts issue 330, which will be important for math rendering in Android and actually does not depend on the MathML issue, so that's certainly something we could focus on in the short term.

Álex and Fred during the MathML breakout session
Photo from @webengineshackfest licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike

Alejandro also proposed to me to prepare a talk about MathML in Web Engines and exciting stuff happening with the MathML Association. I thus gave a brief overview of MathML and presented some demos of native support in Gecko. I also explained how we are trying to start a constructive approach to solve miscommunication between users, spec authors and implementers ; and gather technical and financial resources to obtain a proper solution. In a slightly more technical part, I presented Microsoft's OpenType MATH table and how it can be used for math rendering (and MathML in particular). Finally, I proposed my personal roadmap for MathML in Web engines. Although I do not believe I am a really great speaker, I received positive feedback from attendees. One of the thing I realized is that I do not know anything about the status and plan in EdgeHTML and so overlooked to mention it in my presentation. Its proprietary nature makes hard for external people to contribute to a MathML implementation and the fact that Microsoft is moving away from ActiveX de facto excludes third-party plugin for good and fast math rendering in the future. After I went back to Paris, I thus wrote to Microsoft employee Christian Heilmann (previously working for Mozilla), mentioning at least the MathML in HTML5 Implementation Note and its test suite as a starting point. MathML is currently on the first page of the most voted feature requested for Microsoft Edge and given the new direction taken with Microsoft Edge, I hope we could start a discussion on MathML in EdgeHTML...

Conclusion

This was a great hackfest and I'd like to thank again all the participants and sponsors for making it possible! As Alejandro wrote to me, "I think we have started a very interesting work regarding MathML and web engines in the future.". The short term plan is now to land the WebKit MathML refactoring started during the hackfest and to finish the work. I hope people now understand the importance of fonts with an OpenType MATH table for good mathematical rendering and we will continue to encourage browser vendors and font designers to make such fonts wide spread.

The new approach for WebKit MathML support gives good reason to be optmimistic in the long term and we hope we will be able to get high-quality rendering. The fact that the new approach addresses all the issues formulated by Google and that we started a dialogue on math rendering, gives several options for MathML in Blink. It remains to get Microsoft involved in implementing its own OpenType table in EdgeHTML. Overall, I believe that we can now have a very constructive discussion with the individuals/companies who really want native math support, with the Math WG members willing to have their specification implemented in browsers and with the browser vendors who want a math implementation which is good, clean and compatible with the rest of their code base. Hopefully, the MathML Association will be instrumental in achieving that. If everybody get involved, 2016 will definitely be an exciting year for native MathML in Web engines!

Friday, October 16 2015

Open Font Format 3 released: Are browser vendors good at math?

Version 3 of the Open Font Format was officially published as ISO standard early this month. One of the interesting new feature is that Microsoft's MATH table has been integrated into this official specification. Hopefully, this will encourage type designers to create more math fonts and OS vendors to integrate them into their systems. But are browser vendors ready to use Open Font Format for native MathML rendering? Here is a table of important Open Font Format features for math rendering and (to my knowledge) the current status in Apple, Google, Microsoft and Mozilla products.

FeatureRationaleAppleGoogleMicrosoftMozilla
Pre-installed math fontsMake mathematical rendering possible with the default system fonts.OSX: Obsolete STIX
iOS: no
Android: no
Chrome OS: no
Windows: Cambria Math
Windows phone: no?
Firefox OS: no
MATH table allowed in Web fontsWorkaround the lack of pre-installed math fonts or let authors provide custom math style.WebKit: yes (no font sanitizer?)Blink: yes (OTS)Trident: yes (no font sanitizer?)Gecko: yes (OTS)
USE_TYPO_METRICS OS/2 fsSelection flag taken into accountMath fonts contain tall glyphs (e.g. integrals in display style) and so using the "typo" metrics avoids excessive line spacing for the math text.WebKit: noBlink: yesTrident: yesGecko: yes (gfx/)
Open Font Format FeaturesGood mathematical rendering requires some glyph substitutions (e.g. ssty, flac and dtls).WebKit: yesBlink: yesTrident: yesGecko: yes
Ability to parse the MATH tableGood mathematical rendering requires many font data.WebKit: yes (WebCore/platform/graphics/)Blink: noTrident: yes (LineServices)Gecko (gfx/)
Using the MATH table for native MathML renderingThe MathML specification does not provide detailed rules for mathematical rendering.WebKit: for operator stretching (WebCore/rendering/mathml/)Blink: noTrident: noGecko: yes (layout/mathml/)
Total Score:4/63/64.5/65/6

update: Daniel Cater provided a list of pre-installed fonts on Chrome OS stable, confirming that no fonts with a MATH table are available.

Sunday, January 5 2014

Funding MathML Developments in Gecko and WebKit (part 2)

As I mentioned three months ago, I wanted to start a crowdfunding campaign so that I can have more time to devote to MathML developments in browsers and (at least for Mozilla) continue to mentor volunteer contributors. Rather than doing several crowdfunding campaigns for small features, I finally decided to do a single crowdfunding campaign with Ulule so that I only have to worry only once about the funding. This also sounded more convenient for me to rely on some French/EU website regarding legal issues, taxes etc. Also, just like Kickstarter it's possible with Ulule to offer some "rewards" to backers according to the level of contributions, so that gives a better way to motivate them.

As everybody following MathML activities noticed, big companies/organizations do not want to significantly invest in funding MathML developments at the moment. So the rationale for a crowdfunding campaign is to rely on the support of the current community and on the help of smaller companies/organizations that have business interest in it. Each one can give a small contribution and these contributions sum up in enough money to fund the project. Of course this model is probably not viable for a long term perspective, but at least this allows to start something instead of complaining without acting ; and to show bigger actors that there is a demand for these developments. As indicated on the Ulule Website, this is a way to start some relationship and to build a community around a common project. My hope is that it could lead to a long term funding of MathML developments and better partnership between the various actors.

Because one of the main demand for MathML (besides accessibility) is in EPUB, I've included in the project goals a collection of documents that demonstrate advanced Web features with native MathML. That way I can offer more concrete rewards to people and federate them around the project. Indeed, many of the work needed to improve the MathML rendering requires some preliminary "code refactoring" which is not really exciting or immediately visible to users...

Hence I launched the crowdfunding campaign the 19th of November and we reached 1/3 of the minimal funding goal in only three days! This was mainly thanks to the support of individuals from the MathML community. In mid december we reached the minimal funding goal after a significant contribution from the KWARC Group (Jacobs University Bremen, Germany) with which I have been in communication since the launch of the campaign. Currently, we are at 125% and this means that, minus the Ulule commision and my social/fiscal obligations, I will be able to work on the project during about 3 months.

I'd like to thank again all the companies, organizations and people who have supported the project so far! The crowdfunding campaign continues until the end of January so I hope more people will get involved. If you want better MathML in Web rendering engines and ebooks then please support this project, even a symbolic contribution. If you want to do a more significant contribution as a company/organization then note that Ulule is only providing a service to organize the crowdfunding campaign but otherwise the funding is legally treated the same as required by my self-employed status; feel free to contact me for any questions on the project or funding and discuss the long term perspective.

Finally, note that I've used my savings and I plan to continue like that until the official project launch in February. Below is a summary of what have been done during the five weeks before the holiday season. This is based on my weekly updates for supporters where you can also find references to the Bugzilla entries. Thanks to the Apple & Mozilla developers who spent time to review my patches!

Collection of documents

The goal is to show how to use existing tools (LaTeXML, itex2MML, tex4ht etc) to build EPUB books for science and education using Web standards. The idea is to cover various domains (maths, physics, chemistry, education, engineering...) as well as Web features. Given that many scientific circles are too much biased by "math on paper / PDF" and closed research practices, it may look innovative to use the Open Web but to be honest the MathML language and its integration with other Web formats is well established for a long time. Hence in theory it should "just work" once you have native MathML support, without any circonvolutions or hacks. Here are a couple of features that are tested in the sample EPUB books that I wrote:

  • Rendering of MathML equations (of course!). Since the screen size and resolution vary for e-readers, automatic line breaking / reflowing of the page is "naturally" tested and is an important distinction with respect to paper / PDF documents.
  • CSS styling of the page and equations. This includes using (Web) fonts, which are very important for mathematical publishing.
  • Using SVG schemas and how they can be mixed with MathML equations.
  • Using non-ASCII (Arabic) characters and RTL/LTR rendering of both the text and equations.
  • Interactive document using Javascript and <maction>, <input>, <button> etc. For those who are curious, I've created some videos for an algebra course and a lab practical.
  • Using the <video> element to include short sequences of an experiment in a physics course.
  • Using the <canvas> element to draw graphs of functions or of physical measurements.
  • Using WebGL to draw interactive 3D schemas. At the moment, I've only adapted a chemistry course and used ChemDoodle to load Crystallographic Information Files (CIF) and provide 3D-representation of crystal structures. But of course, there is not any problem to put MathML equations in WebGL to create other kinds of scientific 3D schemas.

WebKit

I've finished some work started as a MathJax developer, including the maction support requested by the KWARC Group. I then tried to focus on the main goals: rendering of token elements and more specifically operators (spacing and stretching).

  • I improved LTR/RTL handling of equations (full RTL support is not implemented yet and not part of the project goal).
  • I improved the maction elements and implemented the toggle actiontype.
  • I refactored the code of some "mrow-like" elements to make them all behave like an <mrow> element. For example while WebKit stretched (some) operators in <mrow> elements it could not stretch them in <mstyle>, <merror> etc Similarly, this will be needed to implement correct spacing around operators in <mrow> and other "mrow-like" elements.
  • I analyzed more carefully the vertical stretching of operators. I see at least two serious bugs to fix: baseline alignment and stretch size. I've uploaded an experimental patch to improve that.
  • Preliminary work on the MathML Operator Dictionary. This dictionary contains various properties of operators like spacing and stretchiness and is fundamental for later work on operators.
  • I have started to refactor the code for mi, mo and mfenced elements. This is also necessary for many serious bugs like the operator dictionary and the style of mi elements.
  • I have written a patch to restore support for foreign objects in annotation-xml elements and to implement the same selection algorithm as Gecko.

Gecko

I've continued to clean up the MathML code and to mentor volunteer contributors. The main goal is the support for the Open Type MATH table, at least for operator stretching.

  • Xuan Hu's work on the <mpadded> element landed in trunk. This element is used to modify the spacing of equations, for example by some TeX-to-MathML generators.
  • On Linux, I fixed a bug with preferred widths of MathML token elements. Concretely, when equations are used inside table cells or similar containers there is a bug that makes equations overflow the containers. Unfortunately, this bug is still present on Mac and Windows...
  • James Kitchener implemented the mathvariant attribute (e.g used by some tools to write symbols like double-struck, fraktur etc). This also fixed remaining issues with preferred widths of MathML token elements. Khaled Hosny started to update his Amiri and XITS fonts to add the glyphs for Arabic mathvariants.
  • I finished Quentin Headen's code refactoring of mtable. This allowed to fix some bugs like bad alignment with columnalign. This is also a preparation for future support for rowspacing and columnspacing.
  • After the two previous points, it was finally possible to remove the private "_moz-" attributes. These were visible in the DOM or when manipulating MathML via Javascript (e.g. in editors, tree inspector, the html5lib etc)
  • Khaled Hosny fixed a regression with script alignments. He started to work on improvements regarding italic correction when positioning scripts. Also, James Kitchener made some progress on script size correction via the Open Type "ssty" feature.
  • I've refactored the stretchy operator code and prepared some patches to read the OpenType MATH table. You can try experimental support for new math fonts with e.g. Bill Gianopoulos' builds and the MathML Torture Tests.

Blink/Trident

MathML developments in Chrome or Internet Explorer is not part of the project goal, even if obviously MathML improvements to WebKit could hopefully be imported to Blink in the future. Users keep asking for MathML in IE and I hope that a solution will be found to save MathPlayer's work. In the meantime, I've sent a proposal to Google and Microsoft to implement fallback content (alttext and semantics annotation) so that authors can use it. This is just a couple of CSS rules that could be integrated in the user agent style sheet. Let's see which of the two companies is the most reactive...

Wednesday, November 14 2012

Writing mathematics in emails

People writing mathematics in emails, like researchers in mathematics or physics, have probably encountered this difficulty to properly format complex mathematical formulas. The most common technique is just to write text with LaTeX-like or ASCIIMathML-like syntax and hope that the recipient will just understand the expressions. Obviously, this is not really convenient to write and read, some errors may happen and result in misunderstandings between the sender and the recipient. There are other classical issues like how to write the math (special syntax? math panel? handwriting recognition?), accessibility, rendering quality etc Of course, these issues are well-known and expected to be addressed by MathML. Since HTML is a common format for email and MathML is now part of HTML5, this is clearly a good candidate to solve the problem of mathematics in emails.

The idea to use MathML in emails is not new and was already suggested in a screenshot from the Mozilla MathML Project more than 10 years ago. Thunderbird has been able to render MathML in newsfeeds for a long time, provided that the author served his content as XHTML. I may also mention Amaya, which added support for sending a document by email in 2007, although I have never figured out how to configure it to send emails. Two years ago, I tried without success to fix a bug to display XHTML attachment inline and which could be a partial solution to the problem. Finally, one year ago Bob Mathews (from Design Science) asked me about the status of MathML in Thunderbird, and I could unfortunately not give him a better answer than what is in the present paragraph. But I hoped that MathML in HTML5 will change the situation.

Indeed, while I was working on some MathML-in-clipboard patches, I realized that it is now possible to paste MathML inside an email. After further discussions with Bob Mathews, Paul Topping & David Carlisle, I've been able to do more testing. The situation is the following:

  • Thunderbird can send emails containing MathML and render them correctly.
  • Apple Mail (used in Mac OS X and iOS) can receive emails containing MathML and should render them correctly since MathML is enabled in Apple's products.
  • Microsoft Outlook does not render MathML in emails. However the rendering is based on Microsoft Word which has MathML support. Basically, Thunderbird sends MathML in HTML5 and Word displays MathML after an XSLT conversion into Microsoft's own OMML format. Hence Microsoft might be able to do something not too complicated to make the whole stuff work.
  • Web Mail Clients like Gmail or Zimbra seem to filter the MathML in emails and so do not render it correctly. If this filter is removed, they can certainly let the browser do the rendering job or use MathJax to do so.

Now let's consider a basic example about how to send MathML in emails, using Thunderbird. One of the issue is that Gecko's editor has really been designed with only HTML-editing features in mind and if you start editing MathML formulas you are going to get some invalid markup messages or other troubles. And of course Thunderbird does not have any math panel or other WYSIWYG tools to write mathematics. However it might not be too difficult to write an add-on to add MathML editing features in Thunderbird like BlueGriffon's add-on or Firemath (these add-on might even be installed without too much trouble in Thunderbird). Or one can of course use one of the existing tools to generate MathML and just paste the code in Thunderbird. Here I'm going to use the itex2MML filter. So first write your mail in a separate text file:

mail.txt

Hi Matthew, I just read your email about the behavior of the factorial function and harmonic series for large values of $n$. If you denote by $\gamma \approx 0.5772156649$ the Euler's number, by $e \approx 2.7182818284$ the Euler's constant then you have the well-known Stirling's approximation:

$$n! = \sqrt{2 \pi n} {\left( \frac{n}{e} \right)}^n \left( 1 + O \left( \frac{1}{n} \right) \right)$$

where of course I use the classical constant $\pi \approx 3.1415926535$. We also have the following asymptotic expansion:

$$\sum_{k=1}^n \frac{1}{k} = \ln(n) + \gamma + O \left( \frac{1}{n} \right)$$

I hope that this answers your question.

then call itex2MML to replace the LaTeX code by <math> elements:

cat mail.txt | itex2MML > mail.html

Write a new mail in Thunderbird and use the menu "Insert ; HTML" . David Carlisle told me that you have to be sure that the "send as HTML" is enabled if it does not show up. Then just copy the mail.html source into the window:

insert MathML

Once you click the insert button, the MathML should be automatically rendered in Thunderbird:

MathML in Thunderbird

When your email is ready, just send it as usual! Here is how it appears on an iPod:

MathML in Apple Mail

Let's just hope that other mail clients will support MathML in emails!

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